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WESTON SUBEDGE CASTLE, GL55 6QT

GETTING THERE

Postcode: GL55 6QT

Lat/Long:  52.063166N 1.815176W

Notes:  The earthworks of the castle are not sign-posted but are easily found to the rear of the church of St Lawrence. The site is accessed from a public path that leads out from the church grounds. On-road parking is possible with care.

WHAT IS THERE TO SEE?

The earthwork remains of a (now dry) moat. This is located on privately owned land but a public footpath runs directly adjacent allowing a good view of the earthworks. The church, parts of which date from the thirteenth century, is also hugely interesting.

NO OFFICIAL SITE

England > South West WESTON SUBEDGE CASTLE

Weston Subedge was already a substantial manor at the time of the Norman invasion at which point it was taken over by the de Cormeilles family. They built a fortified manor house, Weston Subedge Castle, which later passed to the Giffard family. The structure was demolished in the nineteenth century and today only the moat remains.

HISTORY OF WESTON SUBEDGE CASTLE


There has been a settlement at Weston Subedge since the Roman era and, by the Norman invasion, it was a substantial manor valued at £5. The Domesday Book recorded its owner in 1086 as Ansfrid de Cormeilles, an individual who had acquired significant holdings across Gloucestershire following the conquest. He married into the powerful de Lacy family and his heirs retained his estates until the male line of the family failed in the early thirteenth century. They built a manor house at Weston Subedge no later than the twelfth century probably replacing an existing structure.


The manor came into the hands of Godfrey Giffard, Bishop of Worcester in 1269 who built the church immediately adjacent to the castle. Upon his death in 1302 it passed to John Giffard but he joined the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster and was hanged at Gloucester following the defeat at the Battle of Boroughbridge (1322). Weston Subedge, along with the Giffard families other properties, was briefly taken into Crown ownership but was eventually restored to the family who then retained it until 1608.


Today all that remains of this fortified manor house are the earthworks of the square moat. The manor house itself was demolished in the early nineteenth century and regrettably there is now little information on the structure itself.

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